Displaying results for "safety"

If you don’t think your tattoo artist should go in drunk, neither should you! Alcohol and tattoos don’t mix kids…

If you don’t think your tattoo artist should go in drunk, neither should you! Alcohol and tattoos don’t mix kids…

83 notes | Posted Mar 28, 13 #tattoos #lulz #tattoo history #safety #health

Remember: the benefits of moisturizing your skin and protecting it from the sun run deep!
I’d like to hijack this post by reminding you to keep your tattoos (and the rest of your body) maintained well after they’re done healing.

Remember: the benefits of moisturizing your skin and protecting it from the sun run deep!

I’d like to hijack this post by reminding you to keep your tattoos (and the rest of your body) maintained well after they’re done healing.

(via shadood-xxx)

9,843 notes | Posted Mar 27, 13 #tattoos #safety #healing #aging

safepiercing:

Here, ladies and gentlemen, is a perfect example of why you do not use a gun to pierce something. 

image

This cringe-worthy reblog is brought to you by the fine folks at the The Association of Professional Piercers (APP).

This isn’t tattoo related, but taking care to learn about body mod safety and quality is what serious collectors do! Don’t be a poser: do your research!

782 notes | Posted Jan 21, 13 #safety #piercings #body mod #health

Yes this is piercings and not tattoos, but this is why you go to a professional and not some teenager at the mall.
Likewise, why you go to a tattoo artist and not some idiot in a house.

Yes this is piercings and not tattoos, but this is why you go to a professional and not some teenager at the mall.

Likewise, why you go to a tattoo artist and not some idiot in a house.

(Source: dansteinbacher, via eddy-crash)

517 notes | Posted Dec 6, 12 #health #safety #tattoos #health and safety

ichewonpushpins-deactivated2012 Asks

Okay question. I know several people who are HIV positive and regularly get tattoos. While I realize as long as they go to a reputable shop, they probably won't end up sharing needles with someone, are they posing a risk of spreading HIV by getting tattoos?

Hi guys -

Please know that I do not give medical advice like this.

You can live a safe and full life with HIV and a good, safe shop will use lots of protections to stop the spread. But if you have important questions like this (whether you are trying to protect yourself or if you are HIV/AIDS+ and trying to be safe) discuss them with your doctor or tattoo artist.

7 notes | Posted Oct 15, 12 #safety #tattoos #hiv #aids

finiteincantatem7-deactivated20 Asks

What's more important when choosing a shop/artist: skill or cleanliness? I know of great two shops in my town. One has sterilization as their top priority and their guys do very decent work. The other has a more sketchy reputation but their guys do slightly better work. Which shop would you choose?

"What’s less scary: a shitty tattoo or blood infection?"

You need a clean shop that does good work. Do not settle—travel if you want to or have to.

Nothing less than amazing is worthy of your body.

17 notes | Posted Oct 14, 12 #tattoos #safety #quality

WHY THERE’S NO SUCH THING AS A “CHEAP” TATTOO
A couple of people have asked me what “scratchers” are, as I’ve referred to them quite a bit here. A scratcher is someone who scratches at your skin—they don’t tattoo it. Your skin might have some colored markings on it, but it’s not a piece of art. I’m going to quickly go over why there’s no such thing as a cheap tattoo, and why the $20 special will cost you more long-run.
SCRATCHERS HAVE NO HEALTH/SAFETY TRAINING
A tattoo artist will use fresh needles, put their instruments into an autoclave before reusing, use fresh gloves (usually multiple pairs), add a barrier between your body and their seat/arm rest, keep their shop super clean, and are registered with the health department. Scratchers are often missing most or all of these.
Also—you know you can get HIV from sharing needles, right? You know there are people claiming to be tattoo artists who will reuse needles, right? And even if they give you fresh needles, tattooing in a dirty environment or with their dirty hands can lead to infection. Have you seen an infected tattoo before? [click here] I’m not even going to post a picture of it because it’s so fucking gross. And getting that fixed? $$$
YOU WANT A TATTOO THAT WILL LAST OVER TIME
Tattoo ink is injected by the machine so that it’ll be wedged between your layers of skin. Without formal training, it’s hard to learn how deep to put it in, and how to put it in evenly. Fun fact: when you see line work that looks like the one below, most of the ink has fallen out and it not only looks like shit now, but will be totally fucked up in less than a decade.
Also, they usually can’t fucking draw. Just saying.
OKAY, I GOT A SCRATCHER TATTOO. I’M GOING TO FIX IT.
Not that easy! When you want to fix a tattoo, you can either cover it up or lazer, but the most successful strategy is usually a few lazer sessions to lighten it, then covering it up since lazers aren’t 100%.
But if you got a scratcher tattoo? If they used too much black, you won’t be able to cover it up because of how dark it is. So you want to lazer? Because the pigments weren’t all at the same level of skin, the lazer has a hard time locating and breaking them up. So bad tattoos are actually harder to get rid of.
And you thought you were getting a cheap tattoo. The cost is all in the back end.
BUT TATTOOS ARE SO EXPENSIVE
You get what you pay for. With a scratcher, you’re paying for a guy with no training and shitty equipment to inject you with some ink. With a tattoo artist, you pay for:
3-5 years training in a tattoo shop (same time commitment as an undergrad)
Dozens of books, good equipment, and safety equipment like gloves, medical barriers, clean arm rests/chairs, and cleaning products
About 40-60% of the tattoo goes to the shop which trains new tattoo artists; keeps the place clean and stocked; and generally running.
Tattoo artists technically work for themselves, so if they have health insurance or other benefits that come with most jobs, they pay for it.
Free consultations; behind the scenes work like working on your drawings at home; going to conventions to continue learning; and more work that you don’t even see.
THE LARGER IMPACT OF SCRATCHING
When you get a scratch tattoo, you’re not just doing yourself an injustice. You’re supporting a little cockroach which helps take away money from actual tattoo artists.
And, when you run around with your “new ink” telling everyone how you got it for $20, you’re lowing the wages of trained tattoo artists, which lowers the standards of the whole craft.
Finally, you reflect badly on the rest of us. The people who spend good money and love the art are lumped in with your shitty, faded tattoos, and it make it easier to discriminate against tattooed people.
Learn the difference between good and bad tattoos. Learn about the history and safety of the craft. Get good tattoos and be cool.

WHY THERE’S NO SUCH THING AS A “CHEAP” TATTOO

A couple of people have asked me what “scratchers” are, as I’ve referred to them quite a bit here. A scratcher is someone who scratches at your skin—they don’t tattoo it. Your skin might have some colored markings on it, but it’s not a piece of art. I’m going to quickly go over why there’s no such thing as a cheap tattoo, and why the $20 special will cost you more long-run.

SCRATCHERS HAVE NO HEALTH/SAFETY TRAINING

A tattoo artist will use fresh needles, put their instruments into an autoclave before reusing, use fresh gloves (usually multiple pairs), add a barrier between your body and their seat/arm rest, keep their shop super clean, and are registered with the health department. Scratchers are often missing most or all of these.

Also—you know you can get HIV from sharing needles, right? You know there are people claiming to be tattoo artists who will reuse needles, right? And even if they give you fresh needles, tattooing in a dirty environment or with their dirty hands can lead to infection. Have you seen an infected tattoo before? [click here] I’m not even going to post a picture of it because it’s so fucking gross. And getting that fixed? $$$

YOU WANT A TATTOO THAT WILL LAST OVER TIME

Tattoo ink is injected by the machine so that it’ll be wedged between your layers of skin. Without formal training, it’s hard to learn how deep to put it in, and how to put it in evenly. Fun fact: when you see line work that looks like the one below, most of the ink has fallen out and it not only looks like shit now, but will be totally fucked up in less than a decade.

Also, they usually can’t fucking draw. Just saying.

OKAY, I GOT A SCRATCHER TATTOO. I’M GOING TO FIX IT.

Not that easy! When you want to fix a tattoo, you can either cover it up or lazer, but the most successful strategy is usually a few lazer sessions to lighten it, then covering it up since lazers aren’t 100%.

But if you got a scratcher tattoo? If they used too much black, you won’t be able to cover it up because of how dark it is. So you want to lazer? Because the pigments weren’t all at the same level of skin, the lazer has a hard time locating and breaking them up. So bad tattoos are actually harder to get rid of.

And you thought you were getting a cheap tattoo. The cost is all in the back end.

BUT TATTOOS ARE SO EXPENSIVE

You get what you pay for. With a scratcher, you’re paying for a guy with no training and shitty equipment to inject you with some ink. With a tattoo artist, you pay for:

  • 3-5 years training in a tattoo shop (same time commitment as an undergrad)
  • Dozens of books, good equipment, and safety equipment like gloves, medical barriers, clean arm rests/chairs, and cleaning products
  • About 40-60% of the tattoo goes to the shop which trains new tattoo artists; keeps the place clean and stocked; and generally running.
  • Tattoo artists technically work for themselves, so if they have health insurance or other benefits that come with most jobs, they pay for it.
  • Free consultations; behind the scenes work like working on your drawings at home; going to conventions to continue learning; and more work that you don’t even see.

THE LARGER IMPACT OF SCRATCHING

When you get a scratch tattoo, you’re not just doing yourself an injustice. You’re supporting a little cockroach which helps take away money from actual tattoo artists.

And, when you run around with your “new ink” telling everyone how you got it for $20, you’re lowing the wages of trained tattoo artists, which lowers the standards of the whole craft.

Finally, you reflect badly on the rest of us. The people who spend good money and love the art are lumped in with your shitty, faded tattoos, and it make it easier to discriminate against tattooed people.

Learn the difference between good and bad tattoos. Learn about the history and safety of the craft. Get good tattoos and be cool.

619 notes | Posted Sep 4, 12 #scratchers #scratcher #bad tattoos #tattoos #shitty tattoos #health #safety #cheap tattoos #loltattoos

Just got all three of these in a row… I guess now is the time to finally answer this!

What The Hell Is A UV Tattoo?

UV tattoos or blacklight tattoos are tattoos made with a special ink that is visible under an ultraviolet light (blacklight). Depending upon the ink, they can be nearly invisible in non-UV environments, but scarring from the tattoo machine in the application process may remain, so they are never “invisible”. A UV tattoo becomes visible under blacklight, when it glows in colors ranging from white to purple, depending on the ink chosen.

Is It Dangerous?

No tattoo inks are regulated by the FDA (another reason to go to a reputable artist you can trust), so (a) the big seller of the ink in the US which claims it’s USFDA approved is bullshit and (b) there are no large studies on the safety of UV ink vs. other inks.

Jury’s still out on this one, although it seems as if most artists won’t use it.

Does It Last?

There is still no such thing as an invisible tattoo. Many UV tattoos will fade to a henna-type brown as they age. And, even before that, the slight scaring from the application process (which affects nearly all tattoos) will still be visible. (You can see this above.)

Because the process is so new though… again, we’re not entirely sure. We don’t exactly have people walking around with 50 year old UV tribal bands.

Finding An Artist

If you’re willing to be a UV guinea pig, make sure you get a highly experienced tattooists—they should, at the very least, know then need a blacklight within arm’s length of the tattoo chair. Also, if you want a full-color tattoo with UV in it, the full color piece has to be applied then fully healed before UV is added on top: not the other way around.

Because of the weirdness of this tattoo, make sure they have UV pieces in their portfolio already.

(Source: critink)

130 notes | Posted Jul 24, 12 #uv tattoos #tattoos #safety

I JUST LEARNED THAT THE FDA DOESN’T REGULATE TATTOO INKS

As if you needed another reason to go to an artist you really trust: we’re apparently on our own.

32 notes | Posted Jul 24, 12 #or makeup #or suntan lotion #or most food products #gahhhhhhhh #tattoos #bad tattoos #safety

Introducing Scumbag Scratcher: the archtype “self-taught tattoo artist.”
Look at how fucking gross that place is. Do you really want someone to be cutting you open on a table with gross empty bottles on it? Without any gloves or sanitation? No because that’s fucking gross. And if he doesn’t care abut sanity, you know he sure as fuck doesn’t care about the finished product.
I don’t want to dedicate too much time towards shitty tattoos, but I might post one of these every once in a while as a friendly reminder about why we don’t get homemade tattoos.

Introducing Scumbag Scratcher: the archtype “self-taught tattoo artist.”

Look at how fucking gross that place is. Do you really want someone to be cutting you open on a table with gross empty bottles on it? Without any gloves or sanitation? No because that’s fucking gross. And if he doesn’t care abut sanity, you know he sure as fuck doesn’t care about the finished product.

I don’t want to dedicate too much time towards shitty tattoos, but I might post one of these every once in a while as a friendly reminder about why we don’t get homemade tattoos.

268 notes | Posted Jul 24, 12 #bad tattoos #homemade tattoos #safety #scratch #scratcher #tattoos #lulz

shaaana Asks

I've just read your post about white ink tattoo and I had one question left. White ink is rumored to be poisonous/damaging/unhealthy/etc. After your post, I do not believe it to be true but it would be appreciated to have a confirmation. Also a suggestion: Could be great to have a post on rumors and myths about tattoos debunked :) Oh and What do you think about free-hand tattoos?

White ink—from everything I’ve heard, read, and seen—is no more dangerous than any other ink color. It depends on the body (different people can be allergic to different colors) but I wouldn’t worry about it.

Most artists use white ink while either mixing colors or as part of their tattoo designs.

6 notes | Posted Jul 24, 12 #white ink #safety #tattoos

thinkbrigger Asks

Could you do a post about aftercare? I feel like this is a stage that's easy to make mistakes in that isn't frequently addressed. Even when experienced with tattoos the myriad of products and varied directions from artists can be confusing/conflicting. Basic rules, infections/warning signs, permanent ink bleed if you use too much ointment, popular ointments, reminder that following your artist's instructions will often result in free or cheap touch ups should any issues occur. Thank you!

No, I probably won’t ever post about it. I’m not a tattoo artist and aftercare is basically medical advice. All I will say is

  1. Listen to your artist.
  2. If something goes wrong, go to a dermatologist.

2 notes | Posted Jul 19, 12 #after care #aftercare #safety #tattoo aftercare #tattoos #healing

I get a lot of questions about tattoos in real life and online. I think most people with lots of visible tattoos do. But, because I work as a graphic designer, I feel the need to explain to people looking to get their first what they should be looking for when they get one. This photo is a perfect example, so I thought I’d post here.
Look at your artist’s line work.This is the easiest way to check their quality if you don’t know too much about art. Are their lines smooth and consistent?  Or bulky and awkward?
The Octopus uses highlights, dark colors, and little bits of black to give the illusion of line that goes with the style. Look at it’s brain to see what I’m talking about.
Alice’s lines are awkward and misplaced. Look at the two sides of her hair (inconsistent) or her pockets (looks like a middle schooler drew them.)
Channel Paula Deene: we want butter.
Look at how colors meet together. Are they buttery smooth? Choppy? Or do they just not mix?
The Octopus has colors that blend together so awesomely they look 3D. Plus, the orange/blue contrast is awesome.
Alice’s apron is a damn mess. There’s no shading and those hands are already blowing out.
Style
Does the artist have the style you’re looking for? Do you want something spooky or bright? Something girly or foreign? Or a combination? Check to make sure your artist’s style matches your own vision.
Plan ahead!Of course this isn’t totally possible, but think about what else you could want on your body in the future. If you think you might ever be in the market for a back piece, don’t get something small in the middle of your spine. And remember: your relationship with tattoos will change, just like everything else.
Alice’s placement it look like she’s coming out of the tattooed’s boobs. Plus, without more stuff on the chest, you have the awkward dynamic of having a skinny, verticle shape on a large, horizontal canvas.
The Octopus’s placement next to everything else looks awesome, even in relationship to Alice. It takes the shape of her body into account in every way!
Bonus tip: try to only let one artist work on a certain part of your body. That way the styles don’t clash. (Even if Alice had been done correctly, this would still look a little unplanned.)
Don’t do a walk-in
Show up in a shop with an idea and you only get what that artist is capible of doing on the spot, sometimes without references. Bring in a bunch of images and have a talk with the artist—then, plan to come in a few weeks later. You’ll get their best work and more time to ask them to tweek it to perfection.
Is the shop clean and reputable?
Another reason to not do a walk-in appointment. Take a look around the shop while you’re there. If anything about it makes you uncomfortable, it’s not the place for you. Also check out their ratings online. The artist doesn’t have a shop? Or they’re working out of their house? Run. Run fast. That’s the best way to get an infection. 
ABOVE ALL: A GOOD TATTOO AIN’T CHEAP AND A CHEAP TATTOO AIN’T GOOD.

I get a lot of questions about tattoos in real life and online. I think most people with lots of visible tattoos do. But, because I work as a graphic designer, I feel the need to explain to people looking to get their first what they should be looking for when they get one. This photo is a perfect example, so I thought I’d post here.

Look at your artist’s line work.
This is the easiest way to check their quality if you don’t know too much about art. Are their lines smooth and consistent?  Or bulky and awkward?

  • The Octopus uses highlights, dark colors, and little bits of black to give the illusion of line that goes with the style. Look at it’s brain to see what I’m talking about.
  • Alice’s lines are awkward and misplaced. Look at the two sides of her hair (inconsistent) or her pockets (looks like a middle schooler drew them.)

Channel Paula Deene: we want butter.

Look at how colors meet together. Are they buttery smooth? Choppy? Or do they just not mix?

  • The Octopus has colors that blend together so awesomely they look 3D. Plus, the orange/blue contrast is awesome.
  • Alice’s apron is a damn mess. There’s no shading and those hands are already blowing out.
Style
Does the artist have the style you’re looking for? Do you want something spooky or bright? Something girly or foreign? Or a combination? Check to make sure your artist’s style matches your own vision.

Plan ahead!
Of course this isn’t totally possible, but think about what else you could want on your body in the future. If you think you might ever be in the market for a back piece, don’t get something small in the middle of your spine. And remember: your relationship with tattoos will change, just like everything else.

  • Alice’s placement it look like she’s coming out of the tattooed’s boobs. Plus, without more stuff on the chest, you have the awkward dynamic of having a skinny, verticle shape on a large, horizontal canvas.
  • The Octopus’s placement next to everything else looks awesome, even in relationship to Alice. It takes the shape of her body into account in every way!
  • Bonus tip: try to only let one artist work on a certain part of your body. That way the styles don’t clash. (Even if Alice had been done correctly, this would still look a little unplanned.)
Don’t do a walk-in
Show up in a shop with an idea and you only get what that artist is capible of doing on the spot, sometimes without references. Bring in a bunch of images and have a talk with the artist—then, plan to come in a few weeks later. You’ll get their best work and more time to ask them to tweek it to perfection.

Is the shop clean and reputable?

Another reason to not do a walk-in appointment. Take a look around the shop while you’re there. If anything about it makes you uncomfortable, it’s not the place for you. Also check out their ratings online. The artist doesn’t have a shop? Or they’re working out of their house? Run. Run fast. That’s the best way to get an infection. 

ABOVE ALL: A GOOD TATTOO AIN’T CHEAP AND A CHEAP TATTOO AIN’T GOOD.

(via marissalosesit)

4,099 notes | Posted Jul 15, 12 #alice in wonderland #lines #black and white #octopus #critique #color #walk in #walk ins #clean #safety #scratch #scratcher