Displaying results for "planning"

Step 1. Make a consultation
Step 2. Leave a deposit
Step 3. See the drawing
Step 4. Get a tattoo
Step 5. Pay for it
Step 6. Be cool forever
And that’s how you get a tattoo, folks. You don’t see the word haggle in there, right? And it doesn’t say anything about asking them to see a “sample” drawing right? It’s a pretty straight forward process kids. (Thanks to the email submission for this meme!)
  • Step 1. Make a consultation
  • Step 2. Leave a deposit
  • Step 3. See the drawing
  • Step 4. Get a tattoo
  • Step 5. Pay for it
  • Step 6. Be cool forever

And that’s how you get a tattoo, folks. You don’t see the word haggle in there, right? And it doesn’t say anything about asking them to see a “sample” drawing right? It’s a pretty straight forward process kids. (Thanks to the email submission for this meme!)

221 notes | Posted Jan 19, 13 #tattoos #deposit #cost #planning

I think I’ve posted these before, but here are two screen shots of my pinterest boards. This isn’t really expert advice or anything, but so far it’s by far the best way I’ve found to organize ideas. It’s usually a few months to a year until I get a tattoo I decide on (mostly because of finances) so I add things I like as I go along.

The first is for a smaller tattoo that I want, so there’s not a ton of references. You can see I wrote down what I liked about each one, and added an example of greek columns with my preferences as well. Hopefully the artist I chose can take these hints and give it his/her own treatment.

The second is from my sleeve and only has part of what’s on that board. Again, it was all just to give the artist an idea of the style I wanted. I wanted heirloom-type vegetables and handmade tea bags. She didn’t copy any of the images, but could instead see what I wanted and to it up herself. Some advice she took, some she scrapped and did her own way. You can also see a shot on my arm since I travel and she couldn’t see how much space was left.

Hope this helps!

24 notes | Posted Dec 3, 12 #planning

crappygooby Asks

Is it ok for a guy to get a single rose tattoo at chest? Thanks in advance!

Of course! Its your body and roses are cool. Think about where placement would look good (over a pec, symetric over the sternum, etc) and find a good artist. Roses are probably one of the most classic pieces of tattoo imagry and can stand alone if done right.


But somehow I don’t think this question is about asthetics. If anyone gets upset about a guy with a rose tattoo they have some insecurities to work out. Don’t let people’s perceptions of you stop you from modifying your body—whether their complaint is “you’re never going to get a job” or anything about your gender. They’re all haters and don’t have your interests or your agency in mind. You don’t want haters in your life anyway.

23 notes | Posted Nov 12, 12 #tattoos #gender #body shaming #planning

SO THERE’S THIS.

SO THERE’S THIS.

(Source: le-vingt-sept-club, via tattoophotography)

253 notes | Posted Oct 22, 12 #first tattoos #first tattoo #planning

[Here is the post you’re referring too]
[And here’s a similar tattoo someone submitted]
You’re on the right track, but here’s how you can make an original tattoo out of something you found online and love, using this one as an example:
Take the picture(s) you like and save it. My personal favorite way to do this is Pinterest.
Find some more pictures you like. Save those too. (In this case, other geometric patterns, different images of the animal you want.)
Do research into an artist that has a similar style to what you’re looking for. In this case, neo-traditional is probably best, but make sure you go to someone good!
Show it all to your very good artist. Explain to him/her that you love the original but want something completely different and with their own style.
Let them draw and play.
Get a tattoo.

[Here is the post you’re referring too]

[And here’s a similar tattoo someone submitted]

You’re on the right track, but here’s how you can make an original tattoo out of something you found online and love, using this one as an example:

  • Take the picture(s) you like and save it. My personal favorite way to do this is Pinterest.
  • Find some more pictures you like. Save those too. (In this case, other geometric patterns, different images of the animal you want.)
  • Do research into an artist that has a similar style to what you’re looking for. In this case, neo-traditional is probably best, but make sure you go to someone good!
  • Show it all to your very good artist. Explain to him/her that you love the original but want something completely different and with their own style.
  • Let them draw and play.
  • Get a tattoo.

37 notes | Posted Oct 21, 12 #planning #references #rip offs #rip-off #tattoos #white-lung

How You Get An Artist To Give You A Tattoo
Aka: Consultations, Walk-Ins, and Planning
Okay, I thought a lot of people understood this but apparently not. First, read through my [answers and resources] section, especially so you get the planning and artist bits down.
So let’s sat you found an artist and you want Snow White’s poison apple. You’ve been thinking about it for a while, you have a few pictures printed out from the Internet, and you stroll over to the tattoo artist.
You can do a consultation. You go in (with more popular artists, call ahead to set an appointment) and show them what you have. You chat, then you pick a date in a few weeks or something, and you give them a deposit to hold the appointment. (Usually $50-100 dollars that becomes a down-payment when you get your tattoo, but if you cancel you don’t get back.)
Now, you have two options: ask to see the sketch ahead of time, or just get it when you walk in. For most people, asking ahead of time makes sense so you can always [ask the artist to change it] if you need.
You can also do a walk-in. For simpler pieces this is fine, but overall not recommended. You go in, tell the artist what you want, and they draw it before putting it on you. You get something right away, but don’t have much time to edit it and you only get the best they can do on the spot.
Either way, tattooing is a leap of faith in yourself and your artist. That’s why you go to a great one. Even if you’ve wanted a tattoo for a year, what they produce is rarely what you think it will look like in your head—but if you go to a great artist whose style you love, it should be even better.

How You Get An Artist To Give You A Tattoo

Aka: Consultations, Walk-Ins, and Planning

Okay, I thought a lot of people understood this but apparently not. First, read through my [answers and resources] section, especially so you get the planning and artist bits down.

So let’s sat you found an artist and you want Snow White’s poison apple. You’ve been thinking about it for a while, you have a few pictures printed out from the Internet, and you stroll over to the tattoo artist.

You can do a consultation. You go in (with more popular artists, call ahead to set an appointment) and show them what you have. You chat, then you pick a date in a few weeks or something, and you give them a deposit to hold the appointment. (Usually $50-100 dollars that becomes a down-payment when you get your tattoo, but if you cancel you don’t get back.)

Now, you have two options: ask to see the sketch ahead of time, or just get it when you walk in. For most people, asking ahead of time makes sense so you can always [ask the artist to change it] if you need.

You can also do a walk-in. For simpler pieces this is fine, but overall not recommended. You go in, tell the artist what you want, and they draw it before putting it on you. You get something right away, but don’t have much time to edit it and you only get the best they can do on the spot.

Either way, tattooing is a leap of faith in yourself and your artist. That’s why you go to a great one. Even if you’ve wanted a tattoo for a year, what they produce is rarely what you think it will look like in your head—but if you go to a great artist whose style you love, it should be even better.

32 notes | Posted Oct 12, 12 #planning #tattoos

paper-paraphernalia Asks

If I was to get a piece on my rib cage (left side, right next to the boob) of a compass, how could I work it so I could have the possibility of starting/continuing piece with it, but at the same time it not look like it's missing something? if this at all makes sense. Like, I don't have anything else planned at the moment for my ribcage, but if in the future I wanted to, how could I plan the tattoo to incorporate the possible future ones? andy ideas? thanks c: you're awesome, btw.

This goes for all tattoos, since I think once you get something on your ribs you’re not gonna wanna add another thing haha pain central.

What we did when my sleeve was still a half sleeve was add some filler into the piece. Little dusty-yellow flowers. Once I decided to keep going, every little bit got more flowers. It ties everything together and makes it look like one big planned piece, instead of little individual pieces.

For other tattoos you could do this with leaves, bugs, feathers, jewels, or really anything else. Then the next pieces would have that in them too, and it will all tie together visually. Just get a great artist who can see it through from start to finish!!

16 notes | Posted Oct 1, 12 #planning #tattoos


So I got this tattoo when I first turned 18, in a tattoo parlor in a basement in Brooklyn. For $30. My best friend got the other half of the yin yang. In red.

For the record, @newconnellygirl (who has a GREAT fandom blog ya’ll should follow) submitted this as a reason ya’ll should never get a cheap tattoo. Unoriginality aside, look at how flat. Look at those lines! Not good times :c
If you want best friend tattoos, here’s a great way of going about it (after you find a good artist!) Remember, you may not be best friends in a few years. So let’s do something creative you’ll love your whole life:
DON’T get something that you need to be together for. It will look stupid for 525940 minutes every year, and look tacky for the 9 total minutes per year you will be holding them next to each other.
DON’T get names done. I know you guys are like the most little special snow flakes ever, but (a) it’s boring and (b) if you have a falling out, you have to deal with everyone asking you what that tattoo means.
DO google “friendship tattoos” then DON’T get anything on there. Use these as example for what not to do.
DO Get something to symbolize a portion of your life that was special and you both happened to be there for. 
DO Get something you like in common so that it can have multiple meanings.
DO Get unique tattoos. You’re both vegetarians? An avocado and a carrot. You both love Doctor Who? Get your own, unique fandom tattoo. You both love animals? Adorb portraits of your own pets.  Carbon copies are boring and make the chance of regret that much higher.
DO Just get tattoos at the same time. Just something special for you, that your best friend is there for. It makes an awesome memory and will carry another layer of meaning in that same tattoo. @rachelhousle and I are doing actually something similar to this over the next few months. (Pumped!!)

So I got this tattoo when I first turned 18, in a tattoo parlor in a basement in Brooklyn. For $30. My best friend got the other half of the yin yang. In red.

For the record, @newconnellygirl (who has a GREAT fandom blog ya’ll should follow) submitted this as a reason ya’ll should never get a cheap tattoo. Unoriginality aside, look at how flat. Look at those lines! Not good times :c

If you want best friend tattoos, here’s a great way of going about it (after you find a good artist!) Remember, you may not be best friends in a few years. So let’s do something creative you’ll love your whole life:

  • DON’T get something that you need to be together for. It will look stupid for 525940 minutes every year, and look tacky for the 9 total minutes per year you will be holding them next to each other.
  • DON’T get names done. I know you guys are like the most little special snow flakes ever, but (a) it’s boring and (b) if you have a falling out, you have to deal with everyone asking you what that tattoo means.
  • DO google “friendship tattoos” then DON’T get anything on there. Use these as example for what not to do.
  • DO Get something to symbolize a portion of your life that was special and you both happened to be there for. 
  • DO Get something you like in common so that it can have multiple meanings.
  • DO Get unique tattoos. You’re both vegetarians? An avocado and a carrot. You both love Doctor Who? Get your own, unique fandom tattoo. You both love animals? Adorb portraits of your own pets.  Carbon copies are boring and make the chance of regret that much higher.
  • DO Just get tattoos at the same time. Just something special for you, that your best friend is there for. It makes an awesome memory and will carry another layer of meaning in that same tattoo. @rachelhousle and I are doing actually something similar to this over the next few months. (Pumped!!)

83 notes | Posted Sep 28, 12 #critique #submission #tattoos #friend tattoo #friendship tattoos #planning


Hey! So basically, I got this done on the inside of my right ankle back in March. The idea behind it goes with the Butterfly Project, which is a movement to help people who struggle with self-harm, which I have some personal history with (the placement is not coincidental; a lot of thought went into it, because another design I liked would have looked better larger on my back, but this design would have looked better on my ankle, and having it there was important to me). Anyway, sorry for all the detail; I wanted to clarify this right off, because I know people are always quick to judge designs like butterflies, hearts, stars, etc. Mine does hold meaning to me, and I’m happy with how it turned out. I was just wondering what you thought about it, from an artist’s standpoint (line work, shading, etc.). It was my first tattoo, and I’m planning on going back to the same place to get my next one. (Sorry for the iPhone camera quality, lol.)

Second one to submit something from this project! I think it’s an awesome idea to use tattoos like this, really.
It’s a nice little almost-old school butterfly. I can’t really tell what colors the artist used from the phone, but they look nice and bold. The lines in the butterfly radiating from the center are nice. But, it’s still a butterfly tattoo—it looks really quite common to anyone who doesn’t know the story.
Some thoughts on how you could still be a part of this with something more original looking in the future:
Think about metamorphosis since that seems to embody the overall idea better than just a butterfly
Go to an artist who can give you something suuuuper stylize—something that either only barely resembles a butterfly, or does it in a super graphicy way since they are so commonplace
Use the butterfly as a silhouette to create a way cooler scene on the inside. So like you could have a portrait, another animal, flowers, or even deep space—really anything—and the whole outline of a tattoo could be a butterfly.
This is just an example of how even if you want something pretty standard, you can turn it into something original and mindblowing with the right plan and artist.

Hey! So basically, I got this done on the inside of my right ankle back in March. The idea behind it goes with the Butterfly Project, which is a movement to help people who struggle with self-harm, which I have some personal history with (the placement is not coincidental; a lot of thought went into it, because another design I liked would have looked better larger on my back, but this design would have looked better on my ankle, and having it there was important to me). Anyway, sorry for all the detail; I wanted to clarify this right off, because I know people are always quick to judge designs like butterflies, hearts, stars, etc. Mine does hold meaning to me, and I’m happy with how it turned out. I was just wondering what you thought about it, from an artist’s standpoint (line work, shading, etc.). It was my first tattoo, and I’m planning on going back to the same place to get my next one. (Sorry for the iPhone camera quality, lol.)

Second one to submit something from this project! I think it’s an awesome idea to use tattoos like this, really.

It’s a nice little almost-old school butterfly. I can’t really tell what colors the artist used from the phone, but they look nice and bold. The lines in the butterfly radiating from the center are nice. But, it’s still a butterfly tattoo—it looks really quite common to anyone who doesn’t know the story.

Some thoughts on how you could still be a part of this with something more original looking in the future:

  • Think about metamorphosis since that seems to embody the overall idea better than just a butterfly
  • Go to an artist who can give you something suuuuper stylize—something that either only barely resembles a butterfly, or does it in a super graphicy way since they are so commonplace
  • Use the butterfly as a silhouette to create a way cooler scene on the inside. So like you could have a portrait, another animal, flowers, or even deep space—really anything—and the whole outline of a tattoo could be a butterfly.

This is just an example of how even if you want something pretty standard, you can turn it into something original and mindblowing with the right plan and artist.

7 notes | Posted Sep 20, 12 #critique #submission #tattoos #planning

Russ Abbott says: Do know how your tattoo artist is always trying to get you to go big? Here’s a great example of what happens when you listen. Hey ladies, this looks good right?

Russ Abbott says: Do know how your tattoo artist is always trying to get you to go big? Here’s a great example of what happens when you listen. Hey ladies, this looks good right?

50 notes | Posted Sep 18, 12 #good tattoos #planning #tattoos

A classic tattoo is something with history.
Something where the image has stood the test of time over the past 50 years or so. An image that has sprung up again and again, regardless of what time period.

Black and white lion tattoo. This could have been done in the 80’s—you wouldn’t know if it’s taken good care of or touched up now and again.

Skulllllsssss…. (this one by Jeff Gogue) They can look badass, girly, realistic, classic, dot work, stylized… doesn’t matter. These still don’t look as silly as a lot of the ones below. They look aged because of the style that was popular at the time, but not because of the subject.

The Rose. Maybe the single most common tattoo image. Sailor Jerry did them; they came back in the 90’s with tribal; today we do them every which way. As long as they’re crafted well, they’ll never look as out of place as the cliche tattoos we’re about to talk about. (I’m including this picture specifically because of how common banners are. I’d also consider them classic.)
—-
A cliche or kitsch tattoo is a passing trend.
Really, what we consider trendy now is going to end up looking like all of this stuff. Let’s examine a little bit further:

These fairy tattoos were trendy 15 years ago, but now they look dated. No matter what style you do this in. Even if Seth Wood does a fairy, it’s still going to look super 90’s. The only thing that inspired it was what was cool at the time.

Barbed wire tattoos. Any way you slice it bro, that shit is going to look mad 90’s.

You’re all going to hate me now, but guess what this feather is going to look like in 10 years…
—-
This isn’t to say everything falls into either of these categories. But popular imagery does. If something is a common tattoo during a time period, time will tell whether it can hold it’s own or not. More original tattoos will hold their own better than the kitsch ones, without a doubt.

A classic tattoo is something with history.

Something where the image has stood the test of time over the past 50 years or so. An image that has sprung up again and again, regardless of what time period.

Black and white lion tattoo. This could have been done in the 80’s—you wouldn’t know if it’s taken good care of or touched up now and again.

Skulllllsssss…. (this one by Jeff Gogue) They can look badass, girly, realistic, classic, dot work, stylized… doesn’t matter. These still don’t look as silly as a lot of the ones below. They look aged because of the style that was popular at the time, but not because of the subject.

The Rose. Maybe the single most common tattoo image. Sailor Jerry did them; they came back in the 90’s with tribal; today we do them every which way. As long as they’re crafted well, they’ll never look as out of place as the cliche tattoos we’re about to talk about. (I’m including this picture specifically because of how common banners are. I’d also consider them classic.)

—-

A cliche or kitsch tattoo is a passing trend.

Really, what we consider trendy now is going to end up looking like all of this stuff. Let’s examine a little bit further:

These fairy tattoos were trendy 15 years ago, but now they look dated. No matter what style you do this in. Even if Seth Wood does a fairy, it’s still going to look super 90’s. The only thing that inspired it was what was cool at the time.

Barbed wire tattoos. Any way you slice it bro, that shit is going to look mad 90’s.

You’re all going to hate me now, but guess what this feather is going to look like in 10 years…

—-

This isn’t to say everything falls into either of these categories. But popular imagery does. If something is a common tattoo during a time period, time will tell whether it can hold it’s own or not. More original tattoos will hold their own better than the kitsch ones, without a doubt.

36 notes | Posted Sep 12, 12 #bad tattoos #classic #classic tattoos #cliche #critique #kitsch #planning #subject matter #tattoos #trendy #trendy tattoos

museumloot Asks

Hey there, I was just wondering, do you have any tips, or an opinion, about combining/blending different styles of tattoo? For example, I have fairly traditional pieces on my right thigh, left ribs, upper back left arm, inside of my upper right arm, and left foot. However, while I still love the traditional style, for a while I've really been wanting a dotwork, geometric design in black and grey, sort of like a mandala, but i am unsure of how to balance it with my current work. any tips :) thank

Here are a few ways you could go about it:

  • Get filler that matches. Hypothetically, if you have one sleeve of traditional work and another of mixed work, get [filler] that matches the traditional stuff to make it blend a little bit more from a distance.
  • Have the artists bend their style. Dotwork or mandalas could very well look traditional if you add dark lines and bold shapes to them. [Check out this Mike Adams mandala] to see what I mean. Basically just discuss your concerns with a good artist and see what they can come up with!
  • Move to a different part of your body. Really, if two body parts aren’t seen together, aesthetic differences like this won’t be very noticeable. 

8 notes | Posted Sep 12, 12 #planning


I got this tattoo last summer and I’ve found myself very bored of it now. Is there any way I could add to it, aside from just getting it touched up, and it still look good?

Yeah, bored is sort of the word I’d use to describe this too. I mean the script is kind of cute, but even though it says “strength” it doesn’t necessarily say “be strong” or “this is a strong woman” as much as some beautiful imagery could, you know?
Honestly, I would suggest a cover up. Anything you add will get cluttered looking because those lines are so delicate. And it’s facing the wrong direction. (See bottom note.)
Get an amazing tattoo that will floor people. Why did you want strength on you to? Because you want to broadcast your inner strength? Because you’re an athlete? Because you’ve hard hard times and you want to get through the next ones?
Figure out how you can represent that. Maybe with some courageous animal. Maybe by using a myth or fairy tale. Maybe there’s a story here—think of an object from that story. Think of how you can represent your strength (or lack there of) and start looking for great pictures online. Bring it to a tattoo artist, and put something on your arm that will turn heads.
Just realize this is facing the wrong way before you go any further. Check out the placement and wrist tattoo tags on my blog page for more, but if you get anything bigger than this “facing you” it’s going to look absurd.

I got this tattoo last summer and I’ve found myself very bored of it now. Is there any way I could add to it, aside from just getting it touched up, and it still look good?

Yeah, bored is sort of the word I’d use to describe this too. I mean the script is kind of cute, but even though it says “strength” it doesn’t necessarily say “be strong” or “this is a strong woman” as much as some beautiful imagery could, you know?

Honestly, I would suggest a cover up. Anything you add will get cluttered looking because those lines are so delicate. And it’s facing the wrong direction. (See bottom note.)

Get an amazing tattoo that will floor people. Why did you want strength on you to? Because you want to broadcast your inner strength? Because you’re an athlete? Because you’ve hard hard times and you want to get through the next ones?

Figure out how you can represent that. Maybe with some courageous animal. Maybe by using a myth or fairy tale. Maybe there’s a story here—think of an object from that story. Think of how you can represent your strength (or lack there of) and start looking for great pictures online. Bring it to a tattoo artist, and put something on your arm that will turn heads.

Just realize this is facing the wrong way before you go any further. Check out the placement and wrist tattoo tags on my blog page for more, but if you get anything bigger than this “facing you” it’s going to look absurd.

5 notes | Posted Sep 9, 12 #critique #submission #wrist tattoo #planning

Planning Your Sleeve

I’ve been asked this a few times now, so let’s do a nice big long sleeve post. I thought it was pretty obvious how to plan it but I guess not! Check out my #sleeve tag for a few more tips, but here are your two big options in planning a sleeve.

Option 1: Collect a bunch of pieces.

This is the more traditional route to go. Collect a bunch of tattoos over time, and eventually your arm is covered. Pretty easy, right? Here’s what you need to know:

  • The style should be similar. Check out my [Tattoo Quality 101] post to see what I mean, but basically if you don’t have the same artist or artists with similar styles work on the same piece, it looks sloppy.
  • Do you want to go with a theme? Religion/beliefs, under water, family, animals, science… for even more cohesiveness, think about designating one arm for something you want to get a lot of tattoos about. Or not. But it’s a thought,
  • Make sure they’re going in the same direction. [More on that here], but I won’t say anymore since we’ve pretty much beat this question to death, hmm?
  • You’re going to need filler. Basically since all your pieces will be funny shaped, you’ll need smaller pieces to act as puzzle pieces to fit them together. [Read more here.]
Artists unknown, as I can’t find any examples of this type done by a single artist

Option 2: Go for a big scene.

This is becoming much more popular these days, and a big cohesive piece can have a huge visual impact. But it takes a lot more planning, patience, and dedication.

  • Planning, planning, planning. Check out my #planning tag, and read all of it. Because a ton of thought has to go into this, especially if you’re tall as fuck like me and have a bunch of skin to fill. There really isn’t much more to say that hasn’t been said there.
  • Consider stages. You can outline your entire arm first then start filling, or you can do a half sleeve, finish it, then start on the bottom half. Just be prepared to work in big chunks and have at least some of the rest planned out in advanced so it flows.
  • Find the best artist ever. Really. This is your limb we’re talking about here. Once you get going there’s no turning back here unless you decide to paint in your arm solid black. There’s no covering or lazering this much off.
  • Save up some dough. Your artist can move out of state. You’re going to be itching even harder to get it done once you start. We’re talking like 2k to get this done right, so prepare to max out your credit card or start saving your money. This isn’t really a rule, but more of a word of advice.
  • "It’s not done yet." You’re going to have to say that shit a ton. I still have empty space on my arm and I’ve been working on this thing for like a year now.

by Elize Nazelie

156 notes | Posted Sep 6, 12 #sleeve #sleeves #planning #tattoos

strongasmeat Asks

What are your thoughts on tattoos of "dapper" animals, ie animals with top hats and monocles? (Assuming they're done right)

Passing trend. Like everything from passed decades.

  • 80’s and 90’s: devil/angel, Looney Toons, cherries, dolphins, ying yang
  • Earlier 2000’s: nautical stars, cupcakes, and more I’m sure we’ll realize in a few years
  • Today we have dapper animals, but they’ll probably stand up a helluva lot better in time than less-skilled tattoos like feathers, bird silhouettes, infinity symbols, finger mustache, bow ribbons, dandelions,

I don’t think there’s anything wrong with getting tattoos like this. Just be aware of how “retro” that now-cool image will look in a few years.

It’s really the difference between classic and kitsch, which you’ve probably heard me throw around a lot. Flowers have a deep past, so they’ll always be en vogue although the popular styles might change. Same with daggers, keys, butterflies, hearts, banners, script… they’re rooted in tradition and history. They’ll stand a bit better over time.

13 notes | Posted Sep 3, 12 #aging #planning #tattoos