Displaying results for "health"

If you don’t think your tattoo artist should go in drunk, neither should you! Alcohol and tattoos don’t mix kids…

If you don’t think your tattoo artist should go in drunk, neither should you! Alcohol and tattoos don’t mix kids…

83 notes | Posted Mar 28, 13 #tattoos #lulz #tattoo history #safety #health

safepiercing:

Here, ladies and gentlemen, is a perfect example of why you do not use a gun to pierce something. 

image

This cringe-worthy reblog is brought to you by the fine folks at the The Association of Professional Piercers (APP).

This isn’t tattoo related, but taking care to learn about body mod safety and quality is what serious collectors do! Don’t be a poser: do your research!

782 notes | Posted Jan 21, 13 #safety #piercings #body mod #health

Yes this is piercings and not tattoos, but this is why you go to a professional and not some teenager at the mall.
Likewise, why you go to a tattoo artist and not some idiot in a house.

Yes this is piercings and not tattoos, but this is why you go to a professional and not some teenager at the mall.

Likewise, why you go to a tattoo artist and not some idiot in a house.

(Source: dansteinbacher, via eddy-crash)

517 notes | Posted Dec 6, 12 #health #safety #tattoos #health and safety

We have evidence in the roll tattoos played in treating arthritis in ancient civilizations.
But did you also know small dot tattoos are used during laser treatments against breast cancer?
When you’re first using radiation to fight cancer, the radiation oncology facilities will initially mark the area for treatment with a pen. the initial marking pen for the initial setup. However, when the field has been defined, tattoos will be placed in the corners of the field to make sure that the field is as accurate as possible each day. Patients can opt out, but the tattoos are preferred by many specialists. Here’s why, according to one MD:
It’s always nice to have a permanent map by virtue of using tattoos during the process
If you need to treat the other side after remission, you know where the previous radiation field was in case you need to treat the other side. There is no question as to where the prior field went.
Tattoos are really, really tiny, and magic marker marks tend to be thick and imprecise.
If you’re finished treatment and you have a tattoo that shows and gets in the way of your wearing a low-cut dress or your favorite bathing suit, then it’s okay to go to a dermatologist or a plastic surgeon to have the tattoo at the top center of the chest paled or removed with a laser. The remaining “shadow” of the previous tattoo will be enough to use in the future.
[source]

We have evidence in the roll tattoos played in treating arthritis in ancient civilizations.

But did you also know small dot tattoos are used during laser treatments against breast cancer?

When you’re first using radiation to fight cancer, the radiation oncology facilities will initially mark the area for treatment with a pen. the initial marking pen for the initial setup. However, when the field has been defined, tattoos will be placed in the corners of the field to make sure that the field is as accurate as possible each day. 

Patients can opt out, but the tattoos are preferred by many specialists. Here’s why, according to one MD:

  • It’s always nice to have a permanent map by virtue of using tattoos during the process
  • If you need to treat the other side after remission, you know where the previous radiation field was in case you need to treat the other side. There is no question as to where the prior field went.
  • Tattoos are really, really tiny, and magic marker marks tend to be thick and imprecise.

If you’re finished treatment and you have a tattoo that shows and gets in the way of your wearing a low-cut dress or your favorite bathing suit, then it’s okay to go to a dermatologist or a plastic surgeon to have the tattoo at the top center of the chest paled or removed with a laser. The remaining “shadow” of the previous tattoo will be enough to use in the future.

[source]

154 notes | Posted Dec 1, 12 #tattoos #breast cancer #therapy #radiology #cancer #health #cool #science

WHY THERE’S NO SUCH THING AS A “CHEAP” TATTOO
A couple of people have asked me what “scratchers” are, as I’ve referred to them quite a bit here. A scratcher is someone who scratches at your skin—they don’t tattoo it. Your skin might have some colored markings on it, but it’s not a piece of art. I’m going to quickly go over why there’s no such thing as a cheap tattoo, and why the $20 special will cost you more long-run.
SCRATCHERS HAVE NO HEALTH/SAFETY TRAINING
A tattoo artist will use fresh needles, put their instruments into an autoclave before reusing, use fresh gloves (usually multiple pairs), add a barrier between your body and their seat/arm rest, keep their shop super clean, and are registered with the health department. Scratchers are often missing most or all of these.
Also—you know you can get HIV from sharing needles, right? You know there are people claiming to be tattoo artists who will reuse needles, right? And even if they give you fresh needles, tattooing in a dirty environment or with their dirty hands can lead to infection. Have you seen an infected tattoo before? [click here] I’m not even going to post a picture of it because it’s so fucking gross. And getting that fixed? $$$
YOU WANT A TATTOO THAT WILL LAST OVER TIME
Tattoo ink is injected by the machine so that it’ll be wedged between your layers of skin. Without formal training, it’s hard to learn how deep to put it in, and how to put it in evenly. Fun fact: when you see line work that looks like the one below, most of the ink has fallen out and it not only looks like shit now, but will be totally fucked up in less than a decade.
Also, they usually can’t fucking draw. Just saying.
OKAY, I GOT A SCRATCHER TATTOO. I’M GOING TO FIX IT.
Not that easy! When you want to fix a tattoo, you can either cover it up or lazer, but the most successful strategy is usually a few lazer sessions to lighten it, then covering it up since lazers aren’t 100%.
But if you got a scratcher tattoo? If they used too much black, you won’t be able to cover it up because of how dark it is. So you want to lazer? Because the pigments weren’t all at the same level of skin, the lazer has a hard time locating and breaking them up. So bad tattoos are actually harder to get rid of.
And you thought you were getting a cheap tattoo. The cost is all in the back end.
BUT TATTOOS ARE SO EXPENSIVE
You get what you pay for. With a scratcher, you’re paying for a guy with no training and shitty equipment to inject you with some ink. With a tattoo artist, you pay for:
3-5 years training in a tattoo shop (same time commitment as an undergrad)
Dozens of books, good equipment, and safety equipment like gloves, medical barriers, clean arm rests/chairs, and cleaning products
About 40-60% of the tattoo goes to the shop which trains new tattoo artists; keeps the place clean and stocked; and generally running.
Tattoo artists technically work for themselves, so if they have health insurance or other benefits that come with most jobs, they pay for it.
Free consultations; behind the scenes work like working on your drawings at home; going to conventions to continue learning; and more work that you don’t even see.
THE LARGER IMPACT OF SCRATCHING
When you get a scratch tattoo, you’re not just doing yourself an injustice. You’re supporting a little cockroach which helps take away money from actual tattoo artists.
And, when you run around with your “new ink” telling everyone how you got it for $20, you’re lowing the wages of trained tattoo artists, which lowers the standards of the whole craft.
Finally, you reflect badly on the rest of us. The people who spend good money and love the art are lumped in with your shitty, faded tattoos, and it make it easier to discriminate against tattooed people.
Learn the difference between good and bad tattoos. Learn about the history and safety of the craft. Get good tattoos and be cool.

WHY THERE’S NO SUCH THING AS A “CHEAP” TATTOO

A couple of people have asked me what “scratchers” are, as I’ve referred to them quite a bit here. A scratcher is someone who scratches at your skin—they don’t tattoo it. Your skin might have some colored markings on it, but it’s not a piece of art. I’m going to quickly go over why there’s no such thing as a cheap tattoo, and why the $20 special will cost you more long-run.

SCRATCHERS HAVE NO HEALTH/SAFETY TRAINING

A tattoo artist will use fresh needles, put their instruments into an autoclave before reusing, use fresh gloves (usually multiple pairs), add a barrier between your body and their seat/arm rest, keep their shop super clean, and are registered with the health department. Scratchers are often missing most or all of these.

Also—you know you can get HIV from sharing needles, right? You know there are people claiming to be tattoo artists who will reuse needles, right? And even if they give you fresh needles, tattooing in a dirty environment or with their dirty hands can lead to infection. Have you seen an infected tattoo before? [click here] I’m not even going to post a picture of it because it’s so fucking gross. And getting that fixed? $$$

YOU WANT A TATTOO THAT WILL LAST OVER TIME

Tattoo ink is injected by the machine so that it’ll be wedged between your layers of skin. Without formal training, it’s hard to learn how deep to put it in, and how to put it in evenly. Fun fact: when you see line work that looks like the one below, most of the ink has fallen out and it not only looks like shit now, but will be totally fucked up in less than a decade.

Also, they usually can’t fucking draw. Just saying.

OKAY, I GOT A SCRATCHER TATTOO. I’M GOING TO FIX IT.

Not that easy! When you want to fix a tattoo, you can either cover it up or lazer, but the most successful strategy is usually a few lazer sessions to lighten it, then covering it up since lazers aren’t 100%.

But if you got a scratcher tattoo? If they used too much black, you won’t be able to cover it up because of how dark it is. So you want to lazer? Because the pigments weren’t all at the same level of skin, the lazer has a hard time locating and breaking them up. So bad tattoos are actually harder to get rid of.

And you thought you were getting a cheap tattoo. The cost is all in the back end.

BUT TATTOOS ARE SO EXPENSIVE

You get what you pay for. With a scratcher, you’re paying for a guy with no training and shitty equipment to inject you with some ink. With a tattoo artist, you pay for:

  • 3-5 years training in a tattoo shop (same time commitment as an undergrad)
  • Dozens of books, good equipment, and safety equipment like gloves, medical barriers, clean arm rests/chairs, and cleaning products
  • About 40-60% of the tattoo goes to the shop which trains new tattoo artists; keeps the place clean and stocked; and generally running.
  • Tattoo artists technically work for themselves, so if they have health insurance or other benefits that come with most jobs, they pay for it.
  • Free consultations; behind the scenes work like working on your drawings at home; going to conventions to continue learning; and more work that you don’t even see.

THE LARGER IMPACT OF SCRATCHING

When you get a scratch tattoo, you’re not just doing yourself an injustice. You’re supporting a little cockroach which helps take away money from actual tattoo artists.

And, when you run around with your “new ink” telling everyone how you got it for $20, you’re lowing the wages of trained tattoo artists, which lowers the standards of the whole craft.

Finally, you reflect badly on the rest of us. The people who spend good money and love the art are lumped in with your shitty, faded tattoos, and it make it easier to discriminate against tattooed people.

Learn the difference between good and bad tattoos. Learn about the history and safety of the craft. Get good tattoos and be cool.

616 notes | Posted Sep 4, 12 #scratchers #scratcher #bad tattoos #tattoos #shitty tattoos #health #safety #cheap tattoos #loltattoos