Displaying results for "cost"

Step 1. Make a consultation
Step 2. Leave a deposit
Step 3. See the drawing
Step 4. Get a tattoo
Step 5. Pay for it
Step 6. Be cool forever
And that’s how you get a tattoo, folks. You don’t see the word haggle in there, right? And it doesn’t say anything about asking them to see a “sample” drawing right? It’s a pretty straight forward process kids. (Thanks to the email submission for this meme!)
  • Step 1. Make a consultation
  • Step 2. Leave a deposit
  • Step 3. See the drawing
  • Step 4. Get a tattoo
  • Step 5. Pay for it
  • Step 6. Be cool forever

And that’s how you get a tattoo, folks. You don’t see the word haggle in there, right? And it doesn’t say anything about asking them to see a “sample” drawing right? It’s a pretty straight forward process kids. (Thanks to the email submission for this meme!)

221 notes | Posted Jan 19, 13 #tattoos #deposit #cost #planning

solongsidekick Asks

I have a couple questions about payment, these are situations I have never had to deal with. First, would you pay per session, as opposed to when a piece is finished? Difference between artists? Also if a tattoo is finished in 1.2 - 1.4 hours is a second full hour paid for (artist variance?)? Lastly, if an artist estimates 3 hours, and at that point he is nowhere near done, what is the expectation? I assume having enough for an extra hour is smart, but say there is much more left. Would he stop?

This is a pretty basic answer, so the majority of you will probably want to skip it. But I always forget how much people don’t know, so let’s go back to basics.

—-

Okay, so I’m assuming you’ve never gotten a tattoo before? Or a big tattoo? Let’s pretend you’re getting a half sleeve dedicated to how much you love Tumblr or something.

So your artist is like “ok, we can split it into three sessions. Outline, first color, second color.” After you put down your deposit for the drawing, you pay after every session.

So you’re like “how long will the outline take?,” knowing the artist’s rate is $140/hr. They’re like “around 3hrs.” But remember: they’re don’t have a crystal ball. If you’re extra twitchy, need a break, have tougher skin… it might take less or more time. So bring some extra dough no matter what.

At the end it was around 3hrs 20 minutes because you needed to pee or something. So when you ask them, “how much do I owe you?” they’ll tell you. Assuming their rate is $140/hr this will probably be around $460. See how that works? For your first session your deposit will get absorbed into this, and don’t forget to tip!

Again, it always varies, so feel free to ask them if you’re uncomfortable. You can also look under the #cost tag for more.

15 notes | Posted Dec 10, 12 #tattoos #cost

This is a perfect example of how not to approach the price of a tattoo. A “hand” sized tattoo isn’t a bad measurement, but it could be between $70-$900 depending on the artist. (We’re talking scratcher to Amanda Wachob, but still.)
Here’s how to get a quote on a tattoo:
Find a good artist. You can usually see their hourly rate on their website, but if not, remember: it’s going to be on your body forever. It’s worth what you’re going to pay.
Talk to the artist. What they need is: a description with references, a size, and where on your body it’s going to be, and to chit-chat with you. They will give you an estimate.
You have four choices here: set an appointment right away; set an appointment a month or three in advanced to save; come back later to set an appointment when you’ve saved up a bit; or go to someone else and get something you like less.
Don’t haggle. That shit is tacky.
Be cool. Get a tattoo.
Tip what you can. If it’s a big piece I hear it’s understandable not to tip at 15%, but I usually try at least 20%, 30% if it’s a smaller thing. (For my Friday the 13 walk in, it was $13 and I tipped $20 since the actual price probably only covered the cost of supplies.)

This is a perfect example of how not to approach the price of a tattoo. A “hand” sized tattoo isn’t a bad measurement, but it could be between $70-$900 depending on the artist. (We’re talking scratcher to Amanda Wachob, but still.)

Here’s how to get a quote on a tattoo:

  • Find a good artist. You can usually see their hourly rate on their website, but if not, remember: it’s going to be on your body forever. It’s worth what you’re going to pay.
  • Talk to the artist. What they need is: a description with references, a size, and where on your body it’s going to be, and to chit-chat with you. They will give you an estimate.
  • You have four choices here: set an appointment right away; set an appointment a month or three in advanced to save; come back later to set an appointment when you’ve saved up a bit; or go to someone else and get something you like less.
  • Don’t haggle. That shit is tacky.
  • Be cool. Get a tattoo.
  • Tip what you can. If it’s a big piece I hear it’s understandable not to tip at 15%, but I usually try at least 20%, 30% if it’s a smaller thing. (For my Friday the 13 walk in, it was $13 and I tipped $20 since the actual price probably only covered the cost of supplies.)

12 notes | Posted Sep 17, 12 #cost #tattoos

evahayden Asks

I want to to get my first tattoo by David Hale. I need to save money (it's a good size piece) and on his website there is a $100 min fee for tattoos and the rest is "what the client sees fit." This is my first tattoo so I'm not sure what an artist like him expects. I love his work and I don't want to underpay. Advice?

Yeah, so he’s now booked until 2014, only taking projects he likes, and only charges “what the client sees fit.”

Homie is a god among peasants.

  1. I’m only answering this publicly because people should see what an impact FYeahTattoos is having on the industry. He literally blew up after a few people posted his work on there. It’s insane.
  2. Most comparable artists are charging $120-180/hr. Amanda Wachob is the most expensive I know of for $300. But he’s left it so open ended I really have no idea what to tell you hahaha

9 notes | Posted Sep 13, 12 #fyeahtattoos #david hale #cost

(Asked to my personal blog but really belongs here)
Well I’m in the US and I spend about $140USD/hour getting tattooed which is pretty average. That would be about $109 eu/hour.
I can’t really talk about cost of living in other countries, or the fact that our doctors  and surgeons are paid the highest of all other countries. But here’s how that cost brakes down:
Somewhere between 40-60% goes to the shop the artist is in
Initial tattoo drawing (probably at least an hour drawing for every hour tattooing)
Supplies, ink
No health insurance, sick days, vacation days, paid days off
Working without pay to do consultations, answer emails, update their facebook, do their own marketing, buy/design business cards…
Really, they’re making closer to $20-30/hr, I would assume.
That said, Amanda Wochob charged $300USD/hr which I think is a little insane (largely since she owns her own shop and it’s sooo much more than the industry standard), and that would be about $233 eu/hr. But, for her collectors, they would say it’s worth it. And if you like her work, it probably is.
So it really is a quite large range. Hope this helps!

(Asked to my personal blog but really belongs here)

Well I’m in the US and I spend about $140USD/hour getting tattooed which is pretty average. That would be about $109 eu/hour.

I can’t really talk about cost of living in other countries, or the fact that our doctors  and surgeons are paid the highest of all other countries. But here’s how that cost brakes down:

  • Somewhere between 40-60% goes to the shop the artist is in
  • Initial tattoo drawing (probably at least an hour drawing for every hour tattooing)
  • Supplies, ink
  • No health insurance, sick days, vacation days, paid days off
  • Working without pay to do consultations, answer emails, update their facebook, do their own marketing, buy/design business cards…
Really, they’re making closer to $20-30/hr, I would assume.

That said, Amanda Wochob charged $300USD/hr which I think is a little insane (largely since she owns her own shop and it’s sooo much more than the industry standard), and that would be about $233 eu/hr. But, for her collectors, they would say it’s worth it. And if you like her work, it probably is.

So it really is a quite large range. Hope this helps!

10 notes | Posted Sep 11, 12 #tattoos #cost

omnomnompie92 Asks

So, this question isn't so much about tattoos as it is about... etiquette I guess. I can't draw for beans, which is a problem, since I have this awesome vision of a tattoo for my pop-pop in my head. Is it in bad taste to have an artist draw something up, get a quote, (it'll be pricey I know that) and then not set up an appointment within a few weeks? I just want to see it on paper so bad, but I feel it would be almost rude to go and have it drawn any time soon. Thoughts? :/

If the artist is going to draw something, you have to put a deposit for an appointment down. You wouldn’t ask a mechanic to change your oil to “see if you like it” and even though tattoos are most personal, tattoo artists are workers. Just like you and me. Usually it’s about $50-100 just for the sketch and appointment. 

It just seems like your’e broke right now, which is fine. I know the feeling. But you gotta strap on your big girl pants and either save the money or put it on a credit card. Take the extra time to do some great research and you can always book your appointment like a monthish out from when you do your consultation and get the drawing so you can get in before you save that last $100.

4 notes | Posted Sep 5, 12 #choosing an artist #cost

Nope! Not rude at all.
Save up at least $300 for a palm-sized piece, and if you’re starting a sleeve or something larger like $600 to start. (If you want something like a tiny wrist tattoo or a bit of script, I’d say save up $150, but don’t you want something cooler instead?)
During your consultation, once they get a really good idea of what you want, the size, the placement, etc, ask something like: ”About how much do you think this is going to cost?”
They can give you, at that point, a pretty good idea. (Remember to think about the tip too!) If it’s higher than you thought, you have two options: put the rest on a credit card, or (like me) just set your appointment date in like a month or so to give you time to save the rest.
Remember, if it’s a bigger piece you’ll do it in sessions anyway
A good tattoo isn’t cheap and a cheap tattoo isn’t good. You have your whole life ahead of you—take your time now and get a good piece.

Nope! Not rude at all.

  • Save up at least $300 for a palm-sized piece, and if you’re starting a sleeve or something larger like $600 to start. (If you want something like a tiny wrist tattoo or a bit of script, I’d say save up $150, but don’t you want something cooler instead?)
  • During your consultation, once they get a really good idea of what you want, the size, the placement, etc, ask something like: ”About how much do you think this is going to cost?”
  • They can give you, at that point, a pretty good idea. (Remember to think about the tip too!) If it’s higher than you thought, you have two options: put the rest on a credit card, or (like me) just set your appointment date in like a month or so to give you time to save the rest.
  • Remember, if it’s a bigger piece you’ll do it in sessions anyway

A good tattoo isn’t cheap and a cheap tattoo isn’t good. You have your whole life ahead of you—take your time now and get a good piece.

21 notes | Posted Aug 21, 12 #cost #tattoos #tipping

If you take nothing else away from this blog, remember this image. DON’T HAGGLE WITH YOUR ARTIST.
(It’s actually probably more like $500 / $50 but hey…)

If you take nothing else away from this blog, remember this image. DON’T HAGGLE WITH YOUR ARTIST.

(It’s actually probably more like $500 / $50 but hey…)

142 notes | Posted Aug 20, 12 #bad tattoos #cost #tattoos


Wanted to submit this as an example of why cheap tattoos for text don’t always work out. I think I paid either 30 or 40 for this, charged by letter in a shop out a pizza place. Fe means faith in Spanish, got it because I had moved to philly as a leap of faith and I have tattoos for every place I’ve lived. Now it’s fading and the e looks wonky. 
I wish your blog existed when I was getting my tattoos over the past few years


Thanks for being awesome and sharing that story. Mostly because I’ve never heard about getting tattooed out of a pizza shop before hahaha

Wanted to submit this as an example of why cheap tattoos for text don’t always work out. I think I paid either 30 or 40 for this, charged by letter in a shop out a pizza place. Fe means faith in Spanish, got it because I had moved to philly as a leap of faith and I have tattoos for every place I’ve lived. Now it’s fading and the e looks wonky. 

I wish your blog existed when I was getting my tattoos over the past few years

Thanks for being awesome and sharing that story. Mostly because I’ve never heard about getting tattooed out of a pizza shop before hahaha

9 notes | Posted Jul 20, 12 #cost #tattoos #cheap tattoos #bad tattoos #submission

A good tattoo isn’t cheap and a cheap tattoo isn’t good

A good tattoo isn’t cheap and a cheap tattoo isn’t good

134 notes | Posted Jul 20, 12 #bad tattoos #cheap tattoos #cost #home made tattoos #sailor jerry #scratch tattoos #tattoo meme #tattoos #lulz


People think tipping is tacky!?
Let me break it down for ya’ll. Say an artist charged $120/hr of tattooing. That does not meant the artist makes $120 an hour.
A percent (30-50%) of the money goes to the shop
Some money goes to tools and supplies: the machine, new needles, new gloves, paper towel, ink, Vaseline, ink wells…
The artist had to do the drawing (from a few minutes to a few hours, depending on the size of the piece)
They had to answer your emails, chat with you on the phone, or do a consultations
They’re often at the shop when they’re not tattooing doing things like updating their website, answering questions on Facebook, etc
They have no paid vacation, sick time, or health insurance
So yeah. Tip your damn artist.

People think tipping is tacky!?

Let me break it down for ya’ll. Say an artist charged $120/hr of tattooing. That does not meant the artist makes $120 an hour.

  • A percent (30-50%) of the money goes to the shop
  • Some money goes to tools and supplies: the machine, new needles, new gloves, paper towel, ink, Vaseline, ink wells…
  • The artist had to do the drawing (from a few minutes to a few hours, depending on the size of the piece)
  • They had to answer your emails, chat with you on the phone, or do a consultations
  • They’re often at the shop when they’re not tattooing doing things like updating their website, answering questions on Facebook, etc
  • They have no paid vacation, sick time, or health insurance

So yeah. Tip your damn artist.

31 notes | Posted Jul 19, 12 #cost #tips #tattoos #tipping

celestialwaltz Asks

Speaking of tipping! You just reminded me of something that I've been wondering. My artist does free touch-ups, sets up the appointment for it after we do the sitting. I was wondering if you should tip after this sort of thing? Because it seemed like a really great thing to do, but I just wasn't sure what the etiquette is on it.

Tip for freakin’ everything. I got a $13 Friday the 13 tattoo and I tipped him $20 because otherwise he would have been doing it like straight up at cost. Remember they have to buy new supplies and take time off their schedules to do it!

So yeah. Like $20-30 depending on the size and time is reasonable.

5 notes | Posted Jul 19, 12 #cost #tattoos

johnwilkesjuiceandtheboothboxes Asks

A friend of mine were discussing whether or not it is a tattoo faux pas to ask an artist to touch up another tattoo while they are tattooing something else on you. Like, if I have a small, black tattoo with a couple white spots and I'm getting a big tattoo done by another artist, is it rude to ask the new artist to touch up the other tattoo?

I don’t think so if its really only like two spots. I would call ahead or preface the session with something like: “I know it’ll be a few bucks extra, but can you touch up an old one I have too?”

Then show it to them and see how much work it really takes because it might be moe than you thought.

Basically don’t spring it on them haha

7 notes | Posted Jul 19, 12 #cost #touch ups #cover ups

asymptotically Asks

So, I've been interested in getting a tattoo, but I was wondering how much it cost to go in and find out how much the kind of tattoo I want would cost. Just so that I don't walk in without finding out and then I don't have enough money on me. Is this one of those things where you just walk in and ask? Or do I schedule an appointment to ask? And how much would the cost me to ask things like this? Sorry, if this is a dumb question I just don't wanna waste the tattoo artist time or anything.

Not dumb! For larger pieces artists usually have an hourly rate; for smaller ones they can probably give you a price for the individual piece. Here’s a few general tips:

  • The best thing to do is to make a consultation with the artist. Just pick a time to show up, give them your ideas, and chat before you actually get tattooed. That way they can have time to draw it up, and you can also ask about how much it will cost you for when you come in to actually get tattooed.
  • Don’t try to negotiate the price. Some people make this mistake, but you wouldn’t negotiate with an electrician, and artists are workers too!
  • Once they give you the quote, I’d plan to bring a bit more incase you need a break or something and the session runs longer, plus tip!
  • Always tip your artist. If you’re piece is huge I hear they don’t necessarily expect like 15%, but it’s really polite—especially if you wanna go back in the future! I pretty much consistently tip like 20%+, including on my big sleeve, because I know my artist does amazing work and I’m going to keep going back to her for other large pieces.

12 notes | Posted Jul 19, 12 #cost #tattoos #tip

cellarinkny Asks

To the anon who asked that question. All equipment costs money, so as soon as the needle and tube are hooked up I've already spent that money towards your piece whether it your whole back or a word on your wrist. This is why shops have a minimum. So the hourly rate might be $80 but the minimum might be $40 so that for people who want small tats aren't overpriced but the shop still makes a profit!

Yes! I should have mentioned this so thanks.

6 notes | Posted Jul 16, 12 #cost